Lizzie Borden ‘Born In Flames’ Discovers New Life in a New Feminist Generation: NPR


0

Jan Satterfield plays the revolutionary leader of a secret women’s army in the 1983 feminist classic Born in flames.

Argenis Apolinario / Bronx Museum of Art


Hide caption

Caption switch التسمية

Argenis Apolinario / Bronx Museum of Art


Jan Satterfield plays the revolutionary leader of a secret women’s army in the 1983 feminist classic Born in flames.

Argenis Apolinario / Bronx Museum of Art

Lizzie Borden, director Not He should be confused with a serial killer,” the museum curator stated Yasmine Wahi وThe laughter was barely suppressed.

To be clear: Lizzie Borden, the director, was born in the late 1950s, in Detroit. Her chosen one (originally Linda), pays tribute to the infamous axe-killers who dealt a blow to the patriarchy nearly a century ago.

“She was – and still is – a multifaceted radical feminist,” Wahey says of director Lizzie Borden, explaining why her 1983 film born in flame It became the starting point Wahee’s current display at the Bronx Museum of Art On Feminism and the Future. “There’s kind of a shocker about how it has survived the test of time and feels so relevant today.”

Trailer for Lizzie Borden’s debut feature, I was born in flames

Youtube

born in flame It is an entertaining and vibrant mix of punk and sci-fi, set in the not-too-distant future (ie now). The Underground Women’s Army is raging in miserable New York City. As social unrest rocks the street, battalions of women on bicycles roam the bleak city skyline to battle rapists. But the dramatic tension stems in large part from the efforts of women—black and white, heterosexual and heterosexual, working class and elite—to understand and work with one another. On a particularly startling note today, you end up with a group of them bombing the World Trade Center.

“I could only shoot once a month, when I had $200,” Borden told NPR, her voice warm with nostalgia as she remembered making her first feature film. born in flame It took over five years to complete. When I started, Borden was still in her twenties, a Wellesley College graduate and writer art forum The magazine was disappointed by the pervasive misogyny in the art world and its determination to create its own vision for the future. “I’d gather everyone in the old Lincoln Continental I’ve kept parked in front of my upstairs, go somewhere and shoot, and then take the time to edit.”

“Everyone” has included quite a few of today’s celebrities — actor Eric Bogosian as news director held hostage in his first film role, Academy Award-winning future director Kathryn Bigelow playing a distinguished journalist who rejects the army of women — but the film truly belongs to a number of black artists, including It includes civil rights activist Florence Kennedy and former sports star Jan Satterfield, as the charismatic leader of the Women’s Army.

“I thought, OK, there should be lesbians in this movie and there should be black women in this movie, but the problem was, I didn’t know any black women,” Borden recalls. “Downtown, there were only two black artists like Howardina Bendel And the Adrian PiperBut I’ve never met them.”

Borden was looking for the kind of feminist who spoke with more than one voice, she says. And you can’t find it in places like Mrs. magazine on time. I began to read some phrases, Like from the pool of the Kumbhae River, “She remembers. And they were talking about synchronized data of race, class, and gender.”

The professor says these days, this is called intersectionality Susanna Morris who teaches Black Feminism, Digital Media, and African Futurism at Georgia Tech.

“Lizzie Borden went into black communities and got black people involved in creating the work,” Morris says. “This is a particular kind of model – perhaps not for the work of an Afrofuturist – but for white allies, or non-black allies who want to be in conversation with what the potential future could be. The way the film really brings out the inherent extremes of Black feminism, and people think critically Cross, think anti-capitalist, think weird and work — those things were really amazing to me in the movie.”

born in flame Witnessed Rebirth in 2016 – Accurate Restoration by Film Anthology Archives, Promoted by Standard Channel And a new release took Borden to shows all over the world.

It is no accident, Morris says, that the science-fiction-influenced work of the 1980s by Lizzie Borden, Margaret Atwood and Octavia Butler that interrogates rape culture, unpaid women’s work, and deeply dysfunctional governments, resonates with audiences today. However, she finds it disappointing that Borden’s film is still largely shown in museums and college campuses. I wish more people would see يرى born in flameMorris says.

Shoshana Winger’s work 2021 crossing invisible lines, Shown in Born in Fire: The Feminist Future Exhibit at the Bronx Museum of Art.

Argenis Apolinario / Bronx Museum of Art


Hide caption

Caption switch التسمية

Argenis Apolinario / Bronx Museum of Art

Artist Shoshana Weinberger You didn’t see the movie before choosing her work Bronx Museum Gallery, Born in Fire: The Feminist Future. (It’s on until mid-September.) But now she’s proud to display her art alongside Lizzie Borden. “I consider myself working like this,” she says. “The idea of ​​intersectionality in this movie is very prevalent.”

But what happened to film director Lizzie Borden? distance born in flameI made a movie in a brothel. working girls It was her outstanding movie in 1986, and won great reviews by mainstream critics such as Roger Ebert, win prizes in Sundance Film Festivaland picked for national distribution… by the prominent non-feminist Harvey Weinstein. His company, Miramax, produced Borden’s next movie. She thinks it ruined her career.

“What happened to me is that I entered a movie prison, a very dangerous movie prison, with a movie called love crimesThe script was about sex, power, and contentment. She loved it. Produced by The Weinstein Company. Much later, actress Shawn Young accused Weinstein of exposing himself to her during filming. Borden was unaware of this harassment, but he was not. Sure enough, Weinstein called it “difficult” in Hollywood after he wrested control of the film, insisting on retelling it and adding shots that Borden hated. “It kind of wrecked me,” she now says. “And he wouldn’t let me take the name from [Love Crimes] Although in the end it wasn’t my movie.”

Since then, Borden has been working mostly behind the scenes, providing advice on scripts and teaching.

“It was hard,” she says. “It’s been hard to support myself, and I have a lot of debt that I keep transferring.”

Fans wonder why Borden was never tapped to direct episodes of, say, a TV show like Orange is the new black. Professor Susanna Morris feels deceived by all the Lizzie Borden films that were meant to have appeared over the past three decades. “She should have made dozens and dozens – as many films as she wanted,” Morris says. Movies that explore race, power, and sexuality in challenging, funny, and sophisticated ways. Now this is her movie working girls Also restored, by the Standards group, seeing a national reissue this summer, Borden and her vision in time – after years of marginalization – may be allowed to run a riot across the screens.


Like it? Share with your friends!

0

What's Your Reaction?

hate hate
0
hate
confused confused
0
confused
fail fail
0
fail
fun fun
0
fun
geeky geeky
0
geeky
love love
0
love
lol lol
0
lol
omg omg
0
omg
win win
0
win
Mitchel

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *