New York, New Jersey declares emergency amid floods


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The governors of New York and New Jersey declared states of emergency late Wednesday amid torrential floods from the remnants of Hurricane Ida that swept through communities across the Northeast. The National Weather Service recorded 3.15 inches of rain in New York’s Central Park in one hour, far exceeding the 1.94 inches that fell in one hour during Tropical Storm Henry on the night of August 21, which was thought at the time to be the most. , a state of emergency Wednesday night as the National Weather Service also warned flooded New Jersey at risk of hurricanes. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said on Twitter amid the spread of dozens of videos on social media, showing streets with fast-moving water. Murphy declared a state of emergency in all 21 New Jersey counties, urged people to stay away from flooded roads, and contrasting footage showed water inside Newark Liberty International Airport and water pouring into baggage facilities. The airport announced on Twitter that it was suspending all flight activity as of 10:30 p.m. In Kearney, NJ, a roof collapsed in the Postal Service building with people inside, the police sergeant. Chris Levchak said. Rescue teams were at the scene until nightfall, and there was no immediate news of the number of people or the severity of the injuries, and dozens of photos and videos on social media showed water flowing into subway trains across New York City. The Metropolitan Transit Authority announced that subway service was severely limited on all lines due to the weather. Other videos showed flooded streets and water pouring into basement apartments. “If you’re on a stuck train, stay on that train; the safest place to get on the train is unless you hear otherwise from the conductor,” the New York City Subway said on Twitter. outside Philadelphia. Flooding rain prompted the evacuation of thousands of people after water reached dangerous levels at a dam near Johnstown, a Pennsylvania town dubbed the Flood City. Now it’s a tropical storm but looks as relentless as ever with torrential rain and fast-moving storms. . With targeting the northeastern United States over the next several days. Forecasters fear life-threatening and devastating flooding in towns and highways across New England, and in Maryland, a person has died after torrential rain from Ida in a Rockville apartment complex, authorities said Wednesday, and in Pennsylvania, emergency officials scrambled to evacuate About 3000 people. Under a dam near Johnstown hours after heavy rain launched plans to ensure the safety of downstream residents, a video posted on Twitter showed widespread flooding on the streets of Short Hills, New Jersey, and vehicles trapped in floodwaters in North Plainfield, New Jersey. On Reddit, students posted videos of underwater dormitories in Rutgers, on the first day of school, and more than 50 million people in the Northeast alone were under a flash flood warning or watch, four days after Ida landed ashore in Louisiana as a Class 4 . Tornado. The winds waned significantly, but the storm was dumping heavy rain, mostly in areas already saturated with recent floods. The heavy rain could last six to eight hours, AccuWeather’s chief meteorologist Dan Bedinowski warned. The National Weather Service issued a flash flood watch for New York City through Thursday at 2 p.m., and city emergency management officials warned of 5 to 6 inches of rain. Expected locally higher quantities of up to 8 inches possible. Wind gusts could reach 30 miles per hour, authorities said, and social media users posted a video of water running through the streets of Masbeth, Queens, and near John F. Kennedy International Airport, at Louis Armstrong Stadium in New York City, an American open game between 2017. Runners-up Kevin Anderson and Diego Schwartzman were disrupted when rain stormed its way in despite the retractable roof being closed. The city is on the edge of a worrying range of severe weather that a hurricane “isn’t,” said Tom Kaines, AccuWeather’s chief meteorologist. outside the question text.” AccuWeather forecast 4 to 8 inches of rain in parts of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York state, and southern and central New England. Some areas could see as much as 12 inches of rain, AccuWeather said, 2 million people in Louisiana still without electricity amid stifling heat and shortages, Virginia was bracing for heavy rain, flooding and possibly tornadoes on Wednesday.Governor Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency.In Washington, DC, all testing and vaccine sites in the city were closed Wednesday in preparation for the storm, and it was Baltimore distributes sandbags Maryland Emergency Management officials have warned of winds of up to 35 mph that could cause trees to fall, potentially causing power outages, and West Virginia Governor Jim Justice declared a state of emergency in all counties The 55 counties The National Guard prepared to assign 60 members to flood reporting locations and promised to bring in more guard personnel if needed. “Our top priority is our highest priority,” said Lt. Col. Walter Hatfield. It is always the safety and survival of our colleagues in West Virginia.” Guard Operations Manager. “We will do everything in our power to meet any challenge Mother Nature may present to us.” Emergency disaster in anticipation of large-scale flooding. “We’re expecting heavy rain across the state,” Wolf said. “I urge Pennsylvania to … prepare for potential flooding.” And the Boston Meteorological Service warned of “heavy rain from Wednesday night to Thursday … capable of causing flash floods.” The Met Office said up to six inches of rain was likely. “This storm could bring torrential rain as far as southern Maine and southern New Hampshire before finally taking to sea,” the Met Office said Thursday.


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