Pacific Northwest Heat Wave: Dangerous temperatures break records


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Records are set and broken in one city. A record more than a century old broke another record: The entire Northwest baked under triple-digit heat this weekend, and Sunday didn’t beat the heat in much of the region. Records were broken in several cities on Saturday and Sunday and were set to be broken again on Monday. On Saturday, Portland recorded the city’s hottest day ever, hitting 108 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service, just above the previous record for the largest city in Oregon of 107, a mark in 1965 and 1981. The city broke the record again with a score of 110. Just south of Oregon, Salem broke an all-time temperature record on Sunday, hitting 112 degrees Celsius. The previous record of 108 degrees was set in 1981, 1941 and 1927, according to David Bishop, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service In Portland, Seattle recorded 102 degrees on Saturday, the hottest June day and the second warmest day on record in a year 1945. According to the Weather Service. On Sunday, the city also recorded a score of 101, the two hottest consecutive days since records began in 1894, and other cities in Washington state had already broken records by early morning, with Bellingham surpassing the record set in 2011 and Hockyam arriving Already to 100 degrees. Sunday in Portland was expected to be hotter than the day before – the NWS expects a high of 112 degrees. Heat wave in the western US: What’s behind the three-digit ‘dangerous’ temperatures? The Northwest is facing a ‘dangerous heat wave’ in an area where air conditioners usually aren’t needed, but the worst is yet to come: Monday “will be the hottest day for the big cities of Seattle and Portland with the potential for all-time record highs in both cities.” , according to the Meteorological Service. It hits 106 or 107 degrees and Portland is at 112, although Eugene could see temperatures dip as low as 98 degrees. Seattle’s temperature is expected to reach between 100 and 115 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. Most of the two states are under heat warnings as of late Monday, so between 2004 and 2018, an average of nearly 700 people died of heat-related causes each year in the United States. “This can happen when you’re exercising rigorously or when you’re doing yard work outside on a hot day,” Dr. Carolyn King Widall said in a statement from Kaiser Permanente Northwest. “Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check relatives and neighbours,” the Met Office said in a warning. Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any heat dome over the Pacific Northwest has been a bait for the future as climate change reshapes global warming and its effects on public health, said Kristi Ibe, a professor at the University of Washington who studies global warming and its effects on public health. weather patterns around the world. We know from evidence around the world that climate change is increasing the frequency, intensity and duration of heat waves. She said Washington Governor Jay Inslee has lifted restrictions on COVID-19’s ability to owned or operated, not-for-profit cooling centers in light of the heat. Capacity is currently limited to 50% until the state fully reopens on Wednesday. In Oregon, Governor Kate Brown has suspended capacity limits for movie theaters and malls — places equipped with air conditioning — as well as swimming pools ahead of statewide reopenings. Climate change: California’s deserts have lost nearly 40% of their vegetation due to hot weather and drought, satellite data shows, a heatwave in the northwest comes on the heels of another heatwave in June in the west. Excess heat warnings are currently in effect as well as south in Northern California, Western Nevada and parts of Southern California, respectively. Contributing: Zach Ornes, Salem Statesman Journal; Tatiana Parafiniuk-Talesnick Register-Guard; News agency


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